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Dr. Paul Brownback
Dr. Paul Brownback

How to Succeed as CEO of Your Life

“Trophy Kids” are struggling to find themselves, turning to socialism, embracing abortion and alternative lifestyles with no question about the impacts. The “Me Generation” want flexible work schedules, higher pay, and more time off but in spite of their college degrees, they lack basic life skills. “The major problem with guiding our lives by subjective experiences is that God’s basic design for the human being calls us to employ our minds and not our feelings to guide our lives,” says former university president and West Point graduate, Dr. Paul Brownback. Those people who are taught only to feel become vulnerable to false ideas and poor decision-making. “Feelings comprise a poor GPS for our lives.” He identifies 12 principles he wished he had been taught growing up (Greensboro, NC).

Tracey Mitchell
Tracey Mitchell

Becoming Brave

“There is a full-out feminist campaign to make women brash but not bold,” says businesswomen and author Tracey Mitchell. In the wake of #MeToo and the rise of strong feminist leaders in Congress, there is an ever growing hostility that is alienating men and creating confusion among women. Mitchell suggests that women can be both feminine and fierce but they don’t need to be angry or arrogant. She warns that allowing the culture to define women’s roles or capabilities is dangerous. She encourages women to step out of their comfort zones, embrace the unknown, and allow God to move in and through them. “A victorious life is not stumbled upon, it is cultivated,” says Mitchell. “God is searching for audacious faith,” and this moves us from passivity to passion (Dallas, TX).

Tamara Laroux
Tamara Laroux

A Second Chance at Heaven

More young women are taking their own lives than ever before. It is the 10th leading cause of death. Another half a million people visit hospitals every year from self-injury. While white males account for the majority of suicides, young women are up for 50 percent. These rates are rising faster than for young men. Laroux was a young teen when she locked herself in the bathroom and shot herself. “I never lost awareness of what was taking place . . . I knew what I was doing was wrong even as my body crumpled to the tiled shower stall.” After she shot herself, Laroux says, “I was no longer in control of my destiny—I had made a choice with irrevocable, permanent, eternal consequences. What had I done?” She had a glimpse of hell in all of its awfulness – “Lack of hope is the very essence of hell, she says. No science fiction movie or horror novel could compare to what Laroux experienced (Houston, TX).

Tim Riter
Tim Riter

God, A Motorcycle, and the Open Road

An avid outdoorsman, pastor, and teacher, Riter is also part of the counter-cultural era of the 70s where motorcycles, rock & roll and rebellion were synonymous. He has ridden nearly a quarter of a million miles, learned lessons about faith, freedom, and finding fulfillment in the open road toward adventure. “The idea of the freedom of traveling on two wheels out in nature captivates me,” says Riter. A collection of stories and thoughts and meditations and questions intersect – blending a life of adventure with the Creator of our places of adventure (Temecula, CA).

David McAlvany
David McAlvany

The Intentional Legacy

“I found myself separated and estranged from my father. I was lost, hurting, and angry. By the age of thirteen, I was living apart from friends and family, under miserable daily conditions,” says McAlvany. Now the CEO of McAlvany Financial Companies, he looks back at his years of brokenness and defiance as a gift. It was a simple act of forgiveness from his father that turned David McAlvany’s life from one of a prodigal son to one of as successful businessman. In his book, he offers a glimpse into what matters most – a lifetime of living intentionally, for a purpose, for the good of others. McAlvany reminds us that too much focus on financial legacy misses the point altogether. “This is one of the reasons we can never separate the cultural legacy from spiritual legacy or financial legacy. They all tie together. The heart is the common denominator” (Durango, CO).

Patricia Batten
Patricia Batten

Parenting by Faith: What Jesus Said to Parents

Parenting has always been tough. Today, being a parent means worrying about ungodly influence at school, in the media, bullying, and the near-constant pressure to give in to values that are antithetical to how we want to raise our children. If our children are like little sponges for all the right things, they are also sponges for all the wrong things too. But parents know they can’t follow their children around and try to protect them. Parenting by faith means bringing our fears to Jesus with the knowledge that his power is at work in impossible situations,” says Batten. “Jesus has a heart for hurting parents,” reaching out to single moms, widows, prostitutes, and his own mother. This she says “Is a glimpse of God. Jesus hears. His heart for parents and children isn’t surprising. It’s overwhelming.” [Boston, MA].

Carolyn Miller Parr
Carolyn Miller Parr

Love’s Way: Living Peacefully with Your Family as Your Parents Age

By 2030, 1 in 5 residents will be retirement age while the median age is expected to increase to 43 in the next four decades. What do these impending trends mean? Former judge, Carolyn Miller Parr, and mediator, Sig Cohen say the biggest impacts are not just demographic or economic; they are practical and emotional too. Today’s seniors, they say, care more about maintaining the freedom to make their own decisions yet they face loneliness and isolation, even from their own adult children. “When we were growing up, Mom and Dad were the permission givers, advisers, financiers, shelter providers, big-picture framers, and decision-makers,” said Parr and Cohen. “Now children want to advise parents about their parents’ safety, finances, and care.” Some parents feel relief but others feel resentment. When an aging parent prefers autonomy to their own safety this can also create a sense of frustration or fear for adult children. They cover the big issues from communication, sibling rivalries, planning, finances, important documents, and death and dying. “Death is rarely on our conversational agenda,” say the authors. “We wish for our lives to end in a certain way, but we rarely plan for it. Our goal is to show families how to live in peace as parents’ age” (Washington DC).

Courtney Ellis
Courtney Ellis

Uncluttered: Free Your Space, Free Your Schedule, Free Your Soul

Seventy-five percent of garages are so full of stuff that people cannot park their cars inside. Refrigerators are cluttered with coupons, photos, or other objects. Closets burst with unnecessary clothes or shoes. Storage units have become big business. Ellis says research shows that owning more stuff inevitably means also having more stress. But it isn’t just material items. “We gradually but continually stuffed more and more into our lives. Responsibilities, activities, vocations. Children, classes, cross-country moves.” says Ellis. “In addition to all that, technology that barely existed when we’d first gotten married— we now used regularly. We were totally connected, constantly available, and rapidly approaching burnout.” The solution? To downsize, and Ellis explains how to do just that (Mission Viejo, CA).

Casey Diaz
Casey Diaz

The Shot Caller: My Life as a Latino Gangbanger

“I was not looking for God when I was in prison . . . `I barely knew who God was. My life is a miracle in many ways.”

Diaz grew up in gang-ridden Los Angeles where it was all about protecting your turf. “In a few short years, I had become accustomed to brutality, barbarity, and brutishness. When life and death are in your hands, you feel really important. He recounts the violence, the hatred, the reason young people go into gangs, and the consequences that led to his time in New Folsom Prison’s solitary confinement unit. “Nothing affected me. My conscience was gone. My soul had turned black.” It was in his place of isolation, desperation, despair that a Black woman reached out to him from behind the door, “I’m praying for you, and I believe God is going to use you.” The encounter changed Diaz’s life and proved the prayers of a faithful woman were heard (Burbank, CA).

Release Date: March 2019

Dr. Gregory Jantz
Dr. Gregory Jantz

40 Answers for Teen’s Top Questions

“An upset, worried teenager is not a happy camper. [Many] frustrated, distraught teens are often trying to figure out who they want to be,” says Dr. Gregg Jantz. In spite of the negative stereotypes of teen laziness, addiction to technology, and lack of respect for authority, Jantz sees reason to be optimistic about this generation. Jantz and his son collaborate to help parents (and teens) enter one another’s world and understand it. “Teens may vehemently deny it but they do care about what their parents think,” says Jantz. And, according to his son (Gregg Jr.), “Teens want their parents to respect them.” (Seattle, WA).

Healing the Scars of Childhood Abuse

How can parents protect children from abusive predators? And what about broken and dysfunctional parents or stepparents who mistreat or abuse children? Abuse is on the rise. The number of children killed in their own homes is on the rise. In the last ten years, 20,000 children have died in their homes as a result of physical violence. The children who manage to survive the abuse become nine times more likely to be involved in criminal activity. And sadly, the U.S. has some of the highest rates of child abuse among industrialized nations. Dr. Jantz says part of the problem is a culture that sexualizes children and glorifies violence. He offers help and healing for those who have been abused.

Professor Daniel Crane
Daniel A. Crane

7 Books that Rocked the Church

Karl Marx, Charles Darwin, Galileo Galilei, Sigmund Freud, Voltaire, and Joseph Campbell each challenged traditional Christian worldviews. Crane examines books by these men and offers hope for ideas that often oppose Christian values and thought. He encourages us to develop the ability to interact with new and possibly dangerous ideas that stand between faith and reason. How do we handle books or ideas that oppose a Christian worldview? How do we engage with a culture that has little or no faith? Crane tackles topics such as the Enlightenment, psychology, communism, science and politics, and evolution (Ann Arbor, MI).

Dr. Rob Rienow
Dr. Rob Rienow

Visionary Parenting

Less than one-third of all Christians give their hearts to Christ after the age of 21. This means the role of parenting is vital during the formative years. “I can get so caught up in what is urgent that I give no attention to what is important,” says Rienow. “If we are not intentional with our parenting, we run the risk of ending up with a family filled with achievement, recreation, and niceness. God has a far grander plan for us and our children.” Rienow and his wife, Amy, say the job of parenting has become secondary to many other pursuits in modern life. We live with the tyranny of the urgent and forget to live intentionally, especially when it comes to taking advantage of spare moments we can invest in our children’s moral and spiritual development (Chicago, IL).

Generations: Following Jesus as a Family

The family is under enormous pressure as divorce and alternative configurations of “family” have supplanted the traditional family. Dr. Rienow acknowledges that parenting is a daily struggle and pressure to give up and move on prevails in a throw-away culture. But, he says, kids fare better and are more successful as adults when they are raised by a mother and father in an intact home. No other configuration is close to providing stability and nurturing. His 8-session journey explores marriage, forgiveness, trust, repentance, and the Creator’s plan for the family. Solid family, parenting and marriages don’t happen accidentally; they happen with purposeful planning (Wheaton, IL).

Andy Walsh
Andy Walsh

Faith Across the Multiverse: Parables from Modern Science

Science can help us know God. While the church has often had a complicated and even hostile relationship with science Walsh says science reveals much about the God of the universe. A molecular biologist and immunologist he completed postdoctoral work in computational biology. What Walsh does is the help us see the relevance of the Bible, or nature. “Drawing inspiration from the parables and other passages, I am curious about what other attributes of God and our relationship to Him can be articulated in modern scientific terms.” Walsh adds, “I desire to introduce you to the God I have come to know, and the science that helps me think more clearly about Him” (Pittsburgh, PA).

Dr. Joe Malone
Dr. Joe Malone & Sarah Achelpohl Harris

Battles of the Sexes

In a world where the God-given distinction between the sexes is treated with suspicion, Dr. Malone looks at the specific differences and how they impact the way couples interrelate. “These gender-distinct young adult dilemmas are what we are naming the ‘Battles of the Sexes.” They argue that men and women have distinct biochemistries and experience life and marriage differently. Citing the horrendous statistics of 1 in 4 people with an STD and the 4.3 billion hours people watched on Pornhub last year, they argue that gender conflict leads to sexual conflict. Only by honoring God as He created us can we truly find deeply satisfying relationships (Nashville, TN).

Jeffrey S Moore
Jeffrey S. Moore

We Believed: our ten year journey pursuing God’s promises to adopt four children

Only 2 percent of American families ever adopt and international adoptions are becoming more restrictive. Nevertheless, seven million Americans are adopted (1 in 50). Kids in foster care account for the majority of adoptions but foreign-born children are also part of the total. Jeff Moore and his wife took a leap of faith and adopted not one, but four siblings and brought them into their home. They chronicle the challenges, the call to be faithful, and the miracles that occurred along the way. Their step of faith is frightening and rewarding, frustrating and joyful, exciting and exhausting (Denver, CO).

Kelly M Williams
Kelly M. Williams

The Mystery of 23 God Speaks

“God uses a variety of ways and methods to communicate with us,” says Kelly Williams, a pastor for more than two decades. A Southern Baptist graduate (Liberty University) who then went on to earn his ThM from Dallas Theological. He never saw himself as one to be asking questions like, “Does God speak to us personally?” He talks about how we have forgotten that God used dreams and visions in the Bible and that we have lost our ability to discern in today’s cynical world. Williams provides step-by-step clear questions about how we can know if God is speaking to us; 23 to be exact. “God still speaks to us today,” says Williams (Colorado Springs, CO).

Dino Kartsonakis
Dino & Cheryl Kartsonakis

Hymn Restoration: 101 Treasured Hymns with Devotions

In the past twenty years many churches have left behind hymnals and previous styles of worship. Even buildings that once created a sense of awe and wonder have been replaced by warehouses and informal settings. The term “worship wars” describes the vast differences between how Millennials see worship and how older and more traditional people see it. Composer, pianist and Grammy Award winner, Dino Kartsonakis, has been around hymns his entire life. He says few people understand just how powerfully they were inspired, citing Isaac Watts, Charles Wesley, and Fanny Crosby as examples. “This is about introducing a new generation to the musical treasures of Christian history” (Branson, MO).

Cari Gintz
Cari Gintz

Jericho Unmasked: An Entrapped Lesbian’s Journey to Freedom

Betrayal. Shame. Heartbreak. “These were key hallmarks of my emotion,” says Cari Gintz. Sexually abused as a young girl, caught in a legalistic cult, married to a man who came out as gay and left her for another man, Gintz was stressed, hurt, disappointed. Rather than embracing the faith of her childhood, she went the other direction. “It was a time of decadence, and I was free. No boundaries, no hindrances, and no relationship with God seemed the ideal ingredients of happiness,” says Gintz. She recounts her pain-filled journey looking for love. In spite of trying to rectify her gay lifestyle with Christianity she felt conviction. She prayed, “God, help me do what I don’t have the power to do for myself.” He answered her simple prayer. “Now there I stood, consecrated to the Lord and free from the untamable beast in my soul . . . I had been healed of homosexuality.” (Hudson, OH).

Denise Shick
Denise Shick

When Daddy Leaves to be a Girl

Public libraries, funded by taxpayer monies, are being used by drag queens and homosexual activists to mainstream their behaviors to children. According to Shick, the founder of Help4Families and daughter of a transsexual father, normalizing aberrant and unhealthy lifestyles in schools is the antithesis of “safe behavior.” “The earlier pro-homosexual groups can reach your children the greater their influence will be.” The transgender rush for acceptance is just another step in the process of desensitizing the American public to their brokenness. “No studies have proven anyone to have been born transgender,” says Shick. We forget a person’s heart and soul – and their need for freedom from confusion and healing from the past. Instead of acceptance, people with gender confusion need counseling and support. “We need to support the person,” says Shick, “not the desire” (Waynesville, NC).

June Hunt
June Hunt

ENVY & JEALOUSY: Taming the Terrible Twins

Every human craves Love, Significance and Security. What happens when these are missing? In a broken family, in a broken world, jealousy and envy can wreak havoc. Depression and anger are often present when jealousy rears its ugly head. Hunt explains “worldly jealousy is not based on love, but on wrong desires.” With envy comes ingratitude and sense of entitlement. She helps us see that life is not always fair, that gratitude is an antidote for complaining and discontentment, and that God’s desire for us is wholeness. She includes checklists that help us see where we stand on envy and jealousy (Dallas, TX).

Nina Roesner
Nina Rosener

12 Truths to Change Your Marriage

The gender wars are not helping relationships. Feminism is not helping relationships. The attempt to eradicate gender differences is neither helpful to women or men. “The Bible teaches that women are equal to men. Neither gender is better or less than the other. There are differences between the genders, differences between people, and differences between marriages,” says Roesner. But she also says both men and women need one another. “Men are tasked with providing, leading, protecting. Women are tasked with nurturing, caring, and submitting to their husband’s leadership.” While not exactly a message many want to hear, Roesner believes it is a complementary system that works best for women as well as children (Cincinnati, OH).

Edward Moody, PhD
Edward Moody, PhD

First Aid for Emotional Hurts: Helping People Through Difficult Times

School shootings. Bullying. Broken families and hearts. What happens to hurting people? As the old adage goes, “they hurt others.” Moody helps leaders, parents, teachers by giving them the tools they need to help those dealing with emotional hurts, addiction, crisis, mental health challenges or rejection. In a world bent on looking in all the wrong places for answers to complex problems, Moody gives help for meeting emotional needs, not just physical ones. He gives solid answers and hope designed to lead to restoration (Raleigh, NC).

Richard Simmons, III.
Richard Simmons, III.

The Reason for Life

“To live in a relationship with God is why we are here and why we exist,” says Richard Simmons III. The overriding question most people ask at some point in their lives is “Why am I here?” He explains that culture gives us the impression that happiness is the goal of life and that pursing happiness leads to a meaningful life. The opposite is true, “Happiness is the by-product of a meaningful life” not the other way around. “Living with a sense of purpose and meaning increases a person’s overall well-being that includes life satisfaction, mental health, and self-esteem. More significantly, it decreases the chances of suffering from depression.” If purpose and meaning imply design, then we function best when we do what we are designed to do. When we live apart from our design, we malfunction.” Simmons goes on to explain how we can find our purpose, embrace it and live a life of great fulfillment based on God’s design instead of our own (Birmingham, AL).

Michael Grady
Michael Grady

Making God Part of Your Family, Vol 2

A quarter of all Americans have read little or no part of the Bible and yet it was a primary guide for the founding of the United States. From not having the time or making it a priority (reasons given by respondents), the Bible remains the bestselling book of all time. Nearly every home has one (94 percent) but most sit unread and collecting dust. The lack of understanding and reading of the Bible is not getting better; it is getting worse. This is especially true among young people who see it as irrelevant to their lives (Millennials read it least). Less than 20 percent of churchgoers read the Bible and far fewer teens do. Bible reading, even for people of faith, is on the decline. Grady believes our generation is one of the first since the inception of this country that is largely biblically illiterate. Even worse, we are passing on biblical illiteracy to our children and grandchildren. Grady says that for generations of Bible-believers the stories point to a Creator Who desires to be known, wants a relationship with His Creation (Florence, SC).

Dr. Gary Lovejoy

Healing the Scars of Addiction

“I have watched people today be addicted in ways past generations couldn’t have imagined when I started counseling thirty years ago” says Dr. Gregg Jantz. Today, billions of dollars are spent on various life-altering addictions from opioids to technology, food, alcohol, sex and myriad other dependencies. “Addiction doesn’t go away on its own. It doesn’t get better; it gets worse. Pretending addiction doesn’t exist ensures it does,” says Jantz. He offers real-life solutions to reaching out for help, finding freedom, and moving past the prison of shame. The first step to recovery is hard because it means accepting the truth that you have a problem. He helps us see why the first step isn’t enough, how to put your life back together, and embrace lasting freedom (Seattle, WA).

Stephen Black
Stephen Black

Freedom Realized: Finding Freedom from Homosexuality & Living a Life Free From Labels

Black, ex-gay himself but happily married for more than 30 years now, says more than 70% of those seeking help with same-sex attraction through First Stone Ministry and Counseling have been set free. His ground-breaking book is based on years of research and meticulously compiling the results of those who sought freedom. “Humanity is fallen,” says Black. “Heterosexuality is an innate created biological fact and therefore cannot change.” He says any other “orientations” are not part of God’s design. “The grace of God is transformational,” even if one feels an inclination to the opposite sex. Truth, not feelings, should be the guide for our sexuality (Oklahoma City, OK).

Dr. Robert Oscar Lopez
Robert Oscar Lopez, PhD.

The New Normal

“Despite repeated efforts by LGBT activists to equate ‘love’ with toleration of sodomy, the New Testament provides clear definitions of love, which preclude sin,” says Lopez. There is a growing move to normalize homosexuality and transgenderism even within denominations, seminaries, and churches. Raised by two lesbians, he adopted a gay lifestyle and then came to faith in Christ and left the gay lifestyle before embracing God’s design for marriage. He went on to earn his doctoral degree and now teaches at Southwestern Baptist Theological He says unless churches are defending the biblical design for sexuality and marriage in the public square, then they are failing to defend the flock against LGBT activism (Dallas, TX).

Michele Howe
Michele Howe

Navigating the Friendship Maze

There are three key ingredients that add to a happy life; friendships, family, and a lasting marriage. We know that loneliness is bad for one’s health but the opposite, friendship, is good for one’s health. Yet more people feel disconnected from close friendships today than in previous generations. People with the fewest friendship connections suffer from higher rates of depression, heart disease, and anxiety. Howe doesn’t just talk about the health benefits of friendship; she explains the dynamics of good friends or toxic friends. She offers clear and precise definitions of friendship, noting that not everyone knows what it means to be a good friend. A solid friendship “consistently adds to the goodness” of the other person (Monroe, MI).

To schedule an interview email Don Otis at [email protected] or call 719.275.7775

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